Nay

As I become increasingly interested in being a master of language in the spoken and written forms I feel I need to incorporate more unique sentence constructions. That’s of course as I also seek to master the art of toasting and limerick. One of the structures I find impressive and sophisticated is the use of the words “nay.”

Dictionary.com defines the word as:

Adverb: and not only so but; not only that but also;

I love it! It also defines it as the archaic form of “no.” Even better! I would love to fill my vernacular with more archaic words and maybe one day pen a book called, “The Art of Sounding Awesome.”

The idea of this usage is to use as adjective but then one up yourself with another adjective with “nay” between them. What an amazing concept! So I can toss out a word which should elicit some sort of emotional response then go even bigger with that feeling by adding a stronger word? Yes please.

If I’m being entirely honest, this idea just came to me because I heard the Ebony Maw in Infinity War say to Thanos, “Few beings have the greatness, nay, the nobility” and it sounded amazing. I need “nay” in my life.

So here’s a few attempts at some sentences I may try out in 2019 in different situations.

Flirting:

Few women are as pretty, nay, as gorgeous as yourself.

Few women are as charming, nay, as captivating as yourself.

Few smiles are as pleasant, nay, as beautiful as yours.

Few bosoms are as lovely, nay, as tremendous as yours.

Parenting:

Few bedrooms are as cluttered, nay, as disastrous as yours.

Your breath is bad, nay, downright offensive, please brush your teeth.

Your behavior is disconcerting, nay, abhorrent, you must improve.

I love you, nay, cherish you my child.

Teaching:

Your grade is poor, nay, embarrassing.

Your child is a joy, nay, a treasure in class.

Your essay was great, nay, a masterpiece.

You are so dumb, nay, absolutely moronic.

Some gems in there for sure. Can’t wait to begin sprinkling “nay” into normal conversation like salt, nay, sage on a roast. Cheers to fantastic, nay, tremendous conversation!

Word Counts

pexels-photo-265152.jpeg

After reading, 5000 Words Per Hour (The Book), I added a couple of things to my writing strategy. First of all was making writing a daily habit. Done. I did miss the second day, boo…. but I even wrote on a day we were at Six Flags Magic Mountain, and even wrote on Easter. Crushing it!

I am also interested in rewarding myself with short term and long term rewards to motivate me to continue but also to wire my brain with little dopamine burst to keep me going. I haven’t really thought of the reward that I can feasibly do every day but I’ll think of something.

Of all the tips though, I feel the one that had been the best for me, it documenting how many words I write, how quickly I write them and also how many I edit. The author, Chris Fox, discusses how he built his word efficiency through word sprints in which he tries to write as many words as possible in a short amount of time. I began with 10 minutes then up to 20 after a week and yesterday did a sprint of 30  minutes. All throughout I have maintained 3000-3500 word pace. That means that yesterday during my 30 minute sprint I knocked out more than 1500 words. Pretty freaking good. A couple of sprints like that a day means I would complete more than 3000 a day. If (and yes, it’s a big if) I could maintain that for a month then I have an entire manuscript written in a month. Crushing it!

To keep myself accountable, here are my numbers through the first two weeks:

Week 1: Total words written 9,000. Best daily: 3000

Week 2: Total words written 13,690. Best daily 3,000.  Total Words Edited 27,500. Best Daily 10,000

 

Here’s to many more! Cheers!

TBT: Meet Daelysti

Buried in the hills there were many things that humans and other civilized beings chose to avoid. Monsters and creatures of savage natures and evil intents ruled the remote areas. One of these were the orcs. Terrible and savage creatures they were violent and cruel. They were born in blood and died in blood. They were only ruled through force and threat of violence. They only respected might and strength. Such was their kind.

Sworn enemies of the elves which were once of the same ancestors. They lived to see elves slaughtered, but lacking the sophistication and intelligence that the other races possessed, they never succeeded in much more than some surprise raids on undefended farming communities or exploration parties. So it was strange that an elf would seek them out, but in fact one did.

Daelysti was not like most elves. She did not belong to any of the several elf communities that dotted the land. She was a recluse. Short and lean, little about her suggested any strength. Darker than most of the elves seen in the world she had a wildness about her with her hair flowing in various directions as if moved by the wind even when there was none. She wore little, only covering the more intimate parts and carried with her a long spear with an obsidian blade on the tip. The shaft of the spear bore many runes and markings undecipherable by any but the most educated scholars of the time. Her body too was marked by a pattern that resembled lightning. By far the most intimidating feature however was her eyes. Nearly all white they looked like blizzards and just as dangerous. She was no ordinary elf, if there was such a thing.

She appeared from nowhere, just seemed to step from the woods and stood before the entrance to an orc camp before any noticed her. A scrawny orc on guard looked up and yelped before charging the frail elf. Without a word she stood still until it looked as though the orc guard would run her through with his serrated blade. In a movement as swift as a breeze she lifted her spear, plunged it through his throat and removed it again.

So fast was her movement that the orc stepped twice more before realizing that he found it difficult to breath and was light headed. He looked down to see his life pooling at his feet before it all went black.

Many orcs were charging now from various tents and huts recognizing their intruder as an elf, and eager to steal her life away in retaliation for generations of ridicule and disdain. Still Daelysti stood as motionless as one of the trees from which she appeared. Finally she spoke some words that the orcs could not understand. They were words powerful enough to command the air and as she whirled her spear above her head it gathered electricity before spewing it toward the elf’s enemies like bolts of lightning.

Charred, singed and burnt the orcs fell back. Some collapsed from their wounds, some were struck dead by her might and others cowered in fear.

“Bring me your chief!” she shrieked in a high voice that sounded like that of a child. “I wish to speak to him.”

“Orcs don’t talk to elf!” one of the larger orcs growled.

Daelysti closed her eyes and focused her thoughts. She murmured more foreign words and when she opened her eyes she pointed her spear at the brave orc. Lightning flew from the tip of her spear and gripped the orc’s heart, crushing it in his chest. He fell to the ground, smoke rising from his body.

The rest of the group ran off to get their chief. Daelysti smiled weakly, “Good little orcs,” she chuckled.

Story Length

pexels-photo-265152.jpeg

I was recently doing some thinking about how long my stories should be and after a little research found a solid article about story length. To start with I was excited that my stories were right in the wheel house for where I need to be. It was great to see what the word count was for some well known books also. Had no idea, because I never read them, how much longer the Harry Potter books got after the first couple. The Sureshot Rises comes in at 80,000 words which seems like a good length and Sureshot the Assassin is 100,000 words! It feels like a good length for me. It is easy enough to write and edit and readers don’t seem to think it should be shorter or longer.

I’m also interested in getting into the novella or short story game to get more things published more often. We’ll see how that goes. Here’s to more writing! Cheers!

 

Word Sprints

One of the exercises I have done this week in an effort to be more efficient and move my way one step closer to being a real writer is word sprints. The idea is to write as many words as you can in 5 minutes. No editing and as little thinking as possible. Just pound at as many words as I can in 5 minutes. Today I broke 300 for the first time! That’s a 3,600 words per hour pace, which I obviously cannot keep up, but maybe I can build to that level. Regardless, I’m excited to be on this path to improving my writing and getting more words to paper and publishing more work! I feel as though I am really on the path to being a prolific writer even while there is a long ways to go. Enjoying the journey in the meantime. Cheers! pexels-photo-265152.jpeg

5000 Words Per Hour

In an effort to become a successful writer, even though I told myself I didn’t care how many copies I sold, I decided to research some tips on writing and try to improve. I came across a book called 5000 Words Per Hour and immediately downloaded it. Without hesitation, though it was already near midnight, I started reading. In the first section Fox describes a “micro sprint” which means a short period of time to write as much as possible in order to increase efficiency. I am all about getting more words down. So I tried the first exercise which is to write as many words to a story as possible in five minutes.

First try I managed 286 words which is a 3,400 word pace. Not bad for my first try! Now comes the difficult part. I am going to commit to doing that every day for the next week. I’m a little pained just thinking about it, but I think the task is well worth it. I’m looking forward to writing all those words and to improving my efficiency! Here’s to 5000 an hour! Cheers!

51gqAWVUU4L